Nanoporous Xerogels “Sniff Out” Bad Bacteria

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XerogelBacteria were among the first life forms to appear on the face of the Earth and have the uncanny ability to overcome even the harshest of environments, from acidic hot springs to the ice-fields of the poles and deep portions of the Earth’s crust. They are so abundant, that they make up the majority of the total biomass on earth. Astonishingly, nearly 90% of the cells that move around with humans are actually bacteria [1], though since they are so much smaller than human cells, they make up only about 10 percent of our body-weight. Continue reading

MDPI Magazine: The First Year

The MDPI Magazine was started a year ago with an idea to provide an overview of recently published papers from MDPI journals that are of broad interest for the natural science community, particularly those in the life sciences. In this way, and reflecting the growing trend in inter- and multi-disciplinary research, the Magazine aims to raise awareness of current advances in a wide range of scientific disciplines.

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In Silico Docking of Bolinaquinone at Clathrin Terminal Domain

Guest Commentary by Derek McPhee

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Endocytosis is a fundamental process that delivers macromolecules located outside the cell or on the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. It is a necessary process for nutrients to reach the cell, and for regulation of numerous transmembrane receptors. Of the various ways whereby cargo can access the cytoplasm, one of the most researched is the so called clathrin-dependent endocytosis, whose mechanism is relatively well understood. Membrane fragments, along with their contents, enter the cell as vesicles coated with clathrin species. This activity is not only key to the survival and normal functioning of eukaryotic cells, but has also been associated with a variety of pathological states, such as the access of pathogens like virus and bacteria to the cell interior, a number of cancers and other conditions.

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Interview with Eric Freed, Editor-in-Chief of Viruses

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Eric FreedDr. Eric Freed, Editor-in-Chief of the journal Viruses, received his Ph.D. in 1990 with Rex Risser and Howard Temin at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he investigated the function of the murine leukemia virus and HIV envelope glycoproteins in membrane fusion and virus entry. He joined Malcolm Martin at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in 1992, working on topics of virus assembly and entry/post-entry events in the HIV replication cycle, and became Senior Investigator in 2002. Dr. Freed was selected as NCI Mentor of Merit in 2010 for excellence in mentoring and guiding the careers of trainees in cancer research and is currently serving as Chair of the NIH Virology Interest Group, as adjunct Professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Maryland, College Park and as Co-Director of the University of Maryland Virology Program.           Freed Website

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