Updated – Viruses Resources on Ebola Virus and other Filoviruses

Updated – <em>Viruses</em> Resources on Ebola Virus and other Filoviruses

Updated on 26 September 2014

 

Given the current dramatic evolution of the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, Dr. Jens H. Kuhn from the NIH/NIAID/IRF-Frederick has kindly compiled the following list of resources related to the Ebola virus and other filoviruses that were published in the journal Viruses and are hence openly available. We will update the list as new papers on the subject are published.

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Reviving the I3S: The 4th International Symposium on Sensor Science will take place in 2015

Reviving the I3S: The 4th International Symposium on Sensor Science will take place in 2015

Sensors are becoming ever more embedded in our daily lives. They are integral parts of the increasingly complex tools we use. As a result, we have higher levels of convenience, safety and efficiency. Advances in sensors sciences have enabled the creation of self-driving cars, remotely controllable households, fully automated production lines, and airborne drones. And there is still many more to discover. Continue reading

All Hands on Deck: Authoring, Reviewing, Publishing

iStock_000039593548Illustra_blog survey authors reviewersWe continually strive to ensure satisfaction with all the services we provide to authors and readers of our journals. In particular, the careful selection of external expert reviewers is of utmost importance. It is the reviewers’ critical scrutiny that enables authors to improve their scientific output and guarantees the high quality of published articles. We depend on feedback from the author and reviewer communities about their experience. Over the last two years we have collected opinions and ratings from authors and reviewers. Below is a summary of the results: Continue reading

Nanoporous Xerogels “Sniff Out” Bad Bacteria

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XerogelBacteria were among the first life forms to appear on the face of the Earth and have the uncanny ability to overcome even the harshest of environments, from acidic hot springs to the ice-fields of the poles and deep portions of the Earth’s crust. They are so abundant, that they make up the majority of the total biomass on earth. Astonishingly, nearly 90% of the cells that move around with humans are actually bacteria [1], though since they are so much smaller than human cells, they make up only about 10 percent of our body-weight. Continue reading