Non-Coding RNAs and Epigenetics in Cancer: An interview with Dr. Carlo Croce

One of the most unexpected and fascinating discoveries in oncology over the past decade has been the interplay between abnormalities in protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are causally involved in cancer initiation, progression, and dissemination. Although, to date, the most studied non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are microRNAs (miRNAs), the importance of long non-coding RNAs […]

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New and Notable, 29 January 2015

The following research papers were rated very highly during the review process. We hope you also find them interesting.

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Flavonoid Thiol Toxicity: What’s in a Group?

Antioxidants are a direct consequence of the highly oxidizing environment (21% atmospheric dioxygen) in which we live on the third rock from the sun. The switch from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism during the evolution of the majority of organisms on this planet not only resulted in a more efficient liberation of energy from glucose (~30 […]

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The Proteasome Activator PA28γ and P53: It Takes Two to Tango, but Which One Takes the Lead?

The phosphoprotein p53 was trivially named after the apparent molecular mass it runs on SDS-PAGE, i.e., 53-kilodalton (kDa). Ever since its discovery in 1979 by several groups simultaneously, this extraordinary protein has captured the imagination of life scientists. p53 is likely the most extensively studied protein in cell biological research. To underscore its importance, p53 […]

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Leon Terstappen on Circulating Tumor Cells: Biology and Technology

Tumor metastases cause ninety percent of cancer deaths, and occur when cells detach from a primary tumor and form new malignancies elsewhere. This process involves circulating tumor cells (CTC) which intravasate and extravasate (enter and exit the blood vessels) allowing migration to other parts of the body.

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